What's wrong with the current stations?

    The current stations, both over 50 and 100 years old, are outdated and inadequate for modern needs. They lack proper space for modern vehicles, equipment, and safety measures. Renovation isn't feasible due to their small size and inability to meet modern requirements. Additionally, the absence of decontamination facilities poses health risks to firefighters. Upgrading to new facilities is essential for addressing these issues effectively.

    Why can't we just retrofit the stations we have now?

    The current stations, both over 50 and 100 years old, are outdated and inadequate for modern needs. They lack proper space for modern vehicles, equipment, and safety measures. Renovation isn't feasible due to their small size and inability to meet modern requirements. Additionally, the absence of decontamination facilities poses health risks to firefighters. Upgrading to new facilities is essential for addressing these issues effectively.

    Why can't the South Sanford Station be opened back up?

    Reopening the South Sanford Station, which is over 30 years old, isn't viable due to its age and operational limitations. Transitioning to a 2-station model decreases long-term costs and enhances responsiveness, as determined by independent analysis. Returning to a 3- station model would require significant staffing increases, and the station's size doesn't adequately accommodate necessary personnel for calls.

    What's happening to the Springvale Station?

    • The plan is to construct two new modern facilities in well-placed locations to optimally serve the community in terms of economics, efficiency, and effectiveness. Consequently, the Springvale Station must relocate.
    • The City of Sanford recently signed a lease-purchase agreement for a second property at 10 Payne Street (Notre Dame Church) to construct a fire station.
    • Collaboratively, the City of Sanford and the Roman Catholic Diocese are preparing the property for demolition in approximately a year.

    How was the “yearly increased price” of $2.6 million set for the construction of the new fire stations?

    The increased price was determined by the City’s architect based on escalators on material costs and labor costs. Estimators gather data from ongoing construction projects to extrapolate the data needed. 

    What happened with the plan to sell the back portion of theSpringvale Nursery property to the Sanford Housing Authority?

    We conducted a cost-benefit analysis and found it more cost-effective to purchase the Courtney Cleaners property. If we had sold the back portion of the property to SHA, we would have been required to construct a two-story building with retaining walls and install costly in ground storm treatment systems. Now, we'll have a single-story station with a stormwater retention pond that can serve as green space.

    How was the purchase price determined for1274 Main Street and 1280 Main Street?

    The $585,000 payment covered the purchase of two parcels- Springvale Nurseries and the adjacent land. The City conducted an appraisal to ensure that the purchase price did not exceed the appraised value.

    Will there be any intersection work or infrastructure improvements associated with the construction of the new fire stations?

    Yes, but it will be minimal. We'll set up pre-emption, which means lights will be installed specifically for emergency vehicles when they're heading out on a call.

    Did the City use COVID relief funds to purchase the second property after the initial proposal was rejected?

    The previous vote in 2019, was for an undisclosed piece of land, and without details, the community was hesitant about a speculative purchase. When ARPA funds (COVID money) became available, “Public Safety” was deemed an allowable use, and only a portion of the ARPA funds were used. This allowed the City to hold off on bonding for the purchase and instead bond only for the fire station.

    Are there any federal grant funding opportunities being pursued to offset the cost of the new fire stations?

    Various grant opportunities exist, including FEMA, Congressional Direct Spending, USDA, and others, but they can only be pursued after we have an approved project.

    Will the new fire stations improve emergency response times?

    Both locations have been strategically chosen to minimize response times and maintain low ISO ratings. Additionally, the designs of the stations allow for more efficient staffing of vehicles and apparatus, further enhancing our emergency response capabilities

    Why must we construct two new stations at the same time?

    Constructing two new stations simultaneously allows for an efficient modernization of our outdated infrastructure and facilities. This approach minimizes service disruptions, optimizes resource allocation, and yields cost savings for the taxpayers.

    Are there any federal grant funding opportunities being pursued to offset the cost of the new fire stations?

    Various grant opportunities exist, including FEMA, Congressional Direct Spending, USDA, and others, but they can only be pursued after we have an approved project.

    Will there be opportunities for community input or involvement in the final design and planning stages of the new fire stations?

    Yes, there will be opportunities for community input as the final design phase has not been reached. Further community input will be sought after the City has an approved project and moves forward with construction.